Cowboys owner is optimistic about the future of legalized gambling in Texas

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Logan lander

Despite seeing a pair of sports betting tickets (HB 2070 / SB 736Blocked once again by the GOP-dominated Texas legislature, Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones still believes in them and the opportunities the bills could offer.

Dallas Cowboys team running on the field | Photo courtesy of Geoff Burke of USA Today

On MondayJones was speaking with Sports Radio 96.7 FM The Ticket, when asked if he thought sports betting would become standard practice in Texas. He said that given how gambling has been in Texas before, he thinks it may become common practice. As an example of how it would work here, he indicated that Cowboys fans bet in a game broadcast by Tony Romo and using the vernacular of the sport.

“I imagine right there millions of people making a bet on hearing this”, he said. “We have to make sure that the terminology is the kind of terminology that is common, but I can see our game improved tremendously by that aspect of it.

The Cowboys, along along with the Dallas Mavericks and Texas Rangers, are part of the Texas Sports Betting Alliance, which has called on lawmakers to relax their efforts to continue betting outside of Texas. Dallas Cowboys executive vice president and brand chief Charlotte Jones said that gambling is already such a big business in Texas, legalizing it would be a way to offer restrictions and control.

“Unregulated and illegal sports games of chance are already taking place in the state of Texas,” Jones noted. “Legalized sports betting would regulate the industry and generate millions of dollars in new revenue for the state, which would help fund essential programs without raising taxes.”

However, there appears to be little hope for advancing the legislation, with the bill originally dying in May. In an article by TexanLt. Gov. Dan Patrick said the tax revenue that could be earned is not a real selling point for him. He insisted that the progress of legalized gambling is being hampered by competing interests, which is why the bill will likely never be seen.

“That’s why he never goes anywhere” he said, “and so it’s not even a problem that will emerge this session.”